An Oasis in the Desert

Picture the scene. You are stranded in the Sahara Desert on your camel. Lost and running low on water you ponder how on earth people are able to live, or even choose to live in this harsh environment. More to the point how are you going to live in this harsh environment. You scan the horizon and, hoping it’s not a mirage, see the one thing that can save you and the one reason why humans are able to get an existence out of this landscape. You might think that finding an Oasis in the desert is like trying to find an Italian restaurant in Dublin but it’s not that hard and if you’re after a Restaurant then try https://www.forno500.ie/.

It might surprise you, and your Camel that whilst we think of the Desert as being a place of desolation this is not always the case. It’s not like the Antarctic, which is actually worse as there is no Rainfall and no vegetation, whereas the Desert will contain a degree of scrub land and even water. Where does this water come from? The answer lies metres and metres below the surface. Down in the depths there must be a supply of water runs in an underground river or deposit of water that is then funnelled up to the surface. Beneath the Sahara are a series of rocks that push the water back up as it cannot absorb into the soil strata below.

Oasis in the Desert

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The Camel and you should take heart that the actual area covered by the famous shifting Dunes that you associate with the area. Whilst the Sahara is vast, roughly the size of the USA, only fourteen percent of it is that arid, yet picturesque wasteland that might think it is. The rest of it is just scrubland and there is some vegetation for the camel to chew on and for you to burn as it gets very cold at night. Read more On the Trail of the Grey Wolves

Oasis in the Desert

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If you the two of you do need to cross the hot bit there are still various points that they occur. When an Oasis is found it immediately becomes a focal point for the local tribes. The become community centres where trade is conducted, and deals done. They are the settings for holidays and for religious festivals. It is not uncommon for weddings and birthing ceremony’s to be held there. There is also a negative aspect. Whilst in most cases the Oasis is seen as a common ground there have been incidences where the Oasis becomes the scene of conflict. Most wars stem from a disagreement over land and or the resources it contains, and the desert is no different. In fact, these conflicts are more pronounced because of it. Hopefully though your camel and you can saunter over to this one and just hang out under the shady palms, take a cool(ish) draft have a snooze and be on your merry way.

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